Author Archives: dwerle

Two New Water Towers To Be Constructed Soon

Artist's rendering of Charlotte Hall water tower.

Artist’s rendering of Charlotte Hall water tower.

Hollywood and Charlotte Hall, MD — Two new water towers will soon be appearing on the St. Mary’s County skyline. St. Mary’s County Metropolitan Commission (MetCom) Oct. 22 approved the contracts to install a 500,000-gallon water storage tower (WST) in Hollywood and a 400,000-gallon tank in Charlotte Hall. The WSTs will add to the capacity in their respective areas and improve firefighting capabilities.

The contracts for the two towers were bid together to save money. Winning bid of $4,973,859 was awarded to Caldwell Tanks, Inc. of Louisville, KY. According to MetCom Chief Engineer David Elberti, “The contact term to install both tanks is 680 consecutive days. Hollywood WST, per the contract specifications, is to be constructed first. However, Caldwell can choose to construct both WSTs concurrently.”

The Hollywood tower will serve the Broad Creek subdivision and surrounding areas and will be visible from Route 235.

The Charlotte Hall WST will replace capacity from an abandoned tower behind McKay’s Plaza and will add capacity. It will be located adjacent to the Charlotte Hall Park and Ride.

The approval of the contract was unanimous by the commission at its Oct. 22 meeting.

Source:  Written by: Dick Myers, TheBayNet.com

 

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Big New Water Tanks Will Improve Service

W-Waters-tanks2

Two new 90-foot tall water tanks have been built over the last five months at the Aquarion Water Company’s property on Peaceable Ridge, to replace the aging tank at far left. The workers from Kentucky-based Caldwell Tanks expected to finish up this week. — Macklin Reid photo

Two towering 844,000-gallon water tanks are nearing completion on Peaceable Ridge after five months of construction.

It’s part of a long-range effort to improve the Aquarion Water Company’s system in town. First Selectman Rudy Marconi said the company is also talking with the town about extending water lines out to Craigmoor Road — and possibly on to Ridgefield High School — and about putting in fire hydrants along North Street.

The more than $2-million tank project, replacing a lone, aging 488,000-gallon tank with the two new ones, will increase storage capacity on Peaceable Ridge, the top of Aquarion’s system in town.

“They’ll get more out of this, for sure,” said Clint Wathen, superintendent on the job for Caldwell Tanks of Louisville, Ky. “It’s a little bit taller than the old one and it’s got a lot more water.”

The new tanks are 42 feet in diameter, and close to 100 feet tall, according to Wathen.

“High water’s 85 feet, so the top of the tank’s probably about 90,” he said.

The added capacity will strengthen the water system and make it more resilient, according to Mark Fois, Aquarion’s manager of project.

“With more water stored it goes down less sharply and less often, so the benefit will be somewhat invisible, initially. But under high water demand our water system will be more stable for a longer duration,” he said.

“This is not a magic bullet, as a major fire or major water main break can cause serious problems for pressure and supply,” he said..

But the increased storage should lessen the impact problems like that have on regular customers elsewhere along the lines, he said.

“The fire department will have more water to pull upon in a fire,” Fois said.

“So the private customer will be able to continue to use their water when the fire department is fighting a fire around the corner, whereas before major water main breaks and fires would cause water pressure to be reduced in many areas of Ridgefield.”

The tanks will next have to be painted, and are likely to come on line later this summer, said Fois.

RHS? Hydrants?

Marconi said Monday, June 15, that he would be meeting with representatives of Aquarion to discuss other improvements.

“Number one, a discussion about the possibility of extending the Aquarion public water main to Ridgefield High School,” he said.

“The second will be the discussion of the installation of fire hydrants along North Street.”

Several years ago the town extended water lines from Copps Hill area out North Street to the site of Scotland and Barlow Mountain elementary schools, where wells showed high sodium levels.

Now in planning is an extension of the water lines from the elementary schools’ site out to Craigmoor Road. And, Aquarion has asked if the town would be interested in having the lines go out to Ridgefield High School.

“As far as bringing it to the high school, about 10, 12 years ago, we installed new wells located down by Tiger Hollow, to hopefully eliminate a previous coliform problem during the warm summer months — this problem being generated from Lake Mamanasco,” Marconi said.

“To explain that: The goose population impacts Mamanasco, that water travels through fissures in the rock below the surface, eventually traveling to the old wells at the RHS site, thereby creating the issue.”

The wells worked, but extending the lines may be worth studying.

“Installing a public water supply will eliminate that problem from ever happening again,” Marconi said.

Adding fire hydrants on North Street is something the town looked at before — back when the line was extended and the road was dug up.

“At the time of construction of the water main, the water company would not allow the installation along North Street due to unknown water pressure issues,” Marconi said.

“And, although I haven’t heard this yet, I’d assume that because there are now two new water tanks at the Peaceable  Ridge site, instead of the previous one, that the additional tank may allow for the installation of the hydrants at this time.”

Marconi didn’t know what kind of proposal would be put forward to distribute the cost of line extensions and fire hydrant installations.

“We haven’t discussed that yet,” he said.

** Source: Written by Macklin K. Reid, The Ridgefield Press

 

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Demolition Continues on Mason City Water Tower

Mason City Demo

Demolition continues on the South Federal Avenue water tower in Mason City. A new water tower will be built on the same site.

MASON CITY | Demolition continues on Mason City’s water tower on South Federal Avenue. More than half of the bowl had been removed as of Thursday.

The water tower, which was built in the 1940s, is being taken down and will be replaced with a 1-million-gallon water tower similar to the one on 43rd Street Southwest.

Mark Rahm, city engineer, said crews with All Industrial Services, Youngstown, Ohio, were slightly behind due to windy weather earlier in the week but expect to have their portion of the project done by May 19.

The footings and existing foundation will be removed in early June by Caldwell Tanks Inc. of Louisville, Kentucky, Rahm said. Excavation work and new foundations will follow in mid-June and July.

“The new pedestal will start going up in August for the tower,” Rahm said.

The new tower is expected to be in service by the end of September 2016.

“It’s a long process but so far it’s coming along well,” Rahm said.

The cost of the project is $2.139 million to build the water tower and $70,928 for demolition.

** Source: Written by Jeff Heinz, The Globe Gazette

 

 

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New Mandeville Water Tower Takes Shape

New Mandevile water tower off Rapatel Street is shown in this June 3,2015 photo. (Kim Chatelain, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)

New Mandevile water tower off Rapatel Street is shown in this June 3,2015 photo. (Kim Chatelain, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)

A new water tower on the eastern edge of Mandeville has been fully formed and needs only a paint job and a few other finishing touches before being brought on line. The 750,000-gallon, single pedestal tower has been erected on Rapatel Street off U.S. 190 near Fontainebleau State Park and should be operational this summer.

Mandeville Public Works Director Dave deGeneres said the tower will be painted next week, weather permitting. It will be the same sky blue color as the city’s other tower near U.S. 190.

Once painting is complete, the tower will be flushed and tested before being put into service, deGeneres said.

Caldwell Tanks, Inc., of Kentucky, is under contract with the city to build the tank. In April of 2014, the City Council authorized Mayor Donald Villere to sign a $2.85 million contract with to company to build the tower and to move water lines and other parts of the water distribution system that will connect to the new tower. deGeneres said the project is within budget.

Contractors are currently building a 15-by-15 foot cinder block support structure adjacent to the tower, he said. The structure will house electrical equipment and supplies needed to operate the tower.

The Mandeville water system consists of five underground wells and a 750,000-gallon water tower on St. Ann Street, just off U.S. 190 in the central part of the city. Another old water tower on Monroe Street has been decommissioned.

The new tower is designed to improve water pressure, especially for firefighting, facilitate any expansion of the Mandeville water system and allow the city to shut down the St. Ann tower for maintenance, officials have said.

One of the city’s major capital projects, the new water tower dates back to 2012 when it first surfaced on the capital outlay budget. It will be paid for primarily with state money.

** Source: Written by Kim Chatelain, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

 

 

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Caldwell Tanks, Inc. Winner of Elevated Tank of the Year Award from STI/SPFA

Contact: Kevin Gallagher, P.E.                                                         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Email: [email protected]                                     12:00 PM EDT, May 5, 2015

CALDWELL TANKS, INC. WINNER OF ELEVATED TANK OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM STI/SPFA

LOUISVILLE, KY May 5, 2015:  Louisville-based Caldwell Tanks, Inc. won the Elevated Tank of the Year Award from the Steel Tank Institute/Steel Plate Fabricators Association for 2014.

Caldwell constructed a 1,500,000 gallon Steel Fluted Column Elevated Tank for the City of Reedley in California to win the Elevated Tank of the Year.  This tank is located in the central hub of Reedley’s new sports park complex.  As well as storing water, this tank features an internal elevator, multiple interior rooms for various usages, and metal exterior canopies to provide shade and protection to patrons.

Some noteworthy points of this award-winning tank are:

  • Over 660 tons of steel was used in the water tank and supporting structure
  • Over 815 cubic yards of concrete support the structure
  • Over 100,000 square feet of total painted steel surface
  • Over 400 feet of 12 inch diameter steel pipes fill, drain and properly overflow the tank

 About Caldwell Tanks, Inc.
Headquartered in Louisville, KY, Caldwell Tanks, Inc. has been building innovative, customized storage tanks and vessels throughout North America since 1887.  Caldwell is the industry-leading provider of liquid containment structures including elevated storage tanks, ground storage tanks, industrial field-erected tanks and vertical concrete storage structures.  Caldwell also has divisions for power augmentation and coatings solutions.
www.caldwelltanks.com

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New Work-Force Program is Part of a Larger Manufacturing Strategy in Louisville

"The 21st century technical employees must process a sophisticated level of skills," Tony Newberry, president of Jefferson Community and Technical College, said at a kickoff event for the KY FAME program.

“The 21st century technical employees must process a sophisticated level of skills,” Tony Newberry, president of Jefferson Community and Technical College, said at a kickoff event for the KY FAME program.

A new partnership between manufacturing officials and educators aims to address a long-standing need for technically skilled workers in Louisville.

The program comes from the Kentucky Federation for Advance Manufacturing Education, or KY FAME. Participating students will attend classes two days per week at their local community college — in Louisville, that’s Jefferson Community and Technical College. At the same time, they will work an additional 24 hours per week for a sponsoring employer, who will subsidize the student’s college expenses.

At the end of the program, students will have an associate degree, about 70 hours of college credit and 1,800 hours of on-the-job training. They can continue working with the sponsoring employer or go on to pursue another degree.

Toyota Motor Corp. (NYSE: TM), which has an assembly plant in Georgetown, Ky., founded the program in that area. Earlier this month, it was announced that the program would be expanded to a statewide level because of its success in Georgetown.

In Louisville, 12 manufacturers — including GE Appliances, Atlas Machine & Supply Inc., Caldwell Tanks Inc., Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) — are getting involved as sponsor companies. This is one component of a larger, three-part plan to address a skills gap that threatens to undercut growth in the manufacturing industry.

“The 21st century technical employees must process a sophisticated level of skills,” Tony Newberry, president of JCTC, said at a kickoff event today at the school’s downtown campus. For instance, he said, vehicles that are manufactured today contain about 100 tiny computer systems.

GE Appliances CEO Chip Blankenship said a skilled, ready-to-work, productive work force is key for U.S. manufacturing.

He and other manufacturing officials pulled together to help create this program in an effort to move the industry forward, he said. He believes the program will create a pipeline of skilled workers.

Blankenship also noted that officials are in the process of recruiting high school seniors who would participate in the two-year program next year. About 18 to 22 students would participate during the first year.

“The opportunity for full-time employment will be there (from) one of the sponsoring companies,” Blankenship said.

Nationally, manufacturers estimate that 600,000 jobs go unfilled because skilled workers cannot be found, according to a news release from KY FAME. Salaries for these skilled employees can range between $30,000 and $80,000 per year.

** Source: Written By David A. Mann, Louisville Business First

January 29, 2015

Caldwell - green (vector) REVISED            NEWS RELEASE

                                                                                                  For immediate release  

Caldwell Tanks Donates Scholarship to Speed School

Louisville, KY (November 20, 2014) — Caldwell Tanks, Inc. recently donated an endowed scholarship for an undergraduate student in the field of civil engineering to the J.B. Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville.  The student will be selected by the school’s Civil Engineering Department.

This donation further strengthens Caldwell Tanks’ community partnership with the University of Louisville.  Caldwell has maintained a cooperative intern within the engineering department for the past 12 years benefiting the student, the university and Caldwell.  Numerous graduates from the university continue their career at Caldwell.

The endowment funds are managed by the University of Louisville Foundation, Inc.  http://www.louisvillefoundation.org/

________

About Caldwell Tanks, Inc.

Headquartered in Louisville, KY, Caldwell Tanks, Inc. has been building innovative, customized storage tanks and vessels throughout North America since 1887.  Caldwell is the industry-leading provider of liquid containment structures including elevated storage tanks, ground storage tanks, industrial field-erected tanks and vertical concrete storage structures.  Caldwell also has divisions for tank asset preservation programs, power augmentation and coatings solutions.

www.caldwelltanks.com

 

 

# # # #

For more information please contact Tony Burke, Caldwell Tanks, Inc., 502-964-3361; email: [email protected]

 

 

Caldwell Tanks Donates Scholarship to Speed School

Bids Awarded for Water Tank, Line Upgrades

Two bid awards will get sizable city projects under way, including the construction of an elevated water tower to serve the southeastern side of Clinton and water line upgrades for various neighborhoods across the city.

“Both came in under the estimate of the engineer,” City manager Shawn Purvis told City Council, which quickly approved the award of both bids in short order at a Tuesday night planning session.

Council awarded the Southwood Drive 0.5 MG Elevated Tank project to low bidder Caldwell Tanks Inc. of Louisville, Ky. which submitted the lower of two bids, in the amount of $1,326,000.

A select few companies across the country even do such tank work, Purvis noted. The city has already received award of a 20-year, zero interest loan from the N.C. Division of Water Infrastructure Revolving Loan program.

“The elevated tank is part of our addition with the water plant.” Purvis said. A massive water plant expansion that will double the size of the city’s water treatment plant, as well as establish a redundant water line, is currently in the works.

A complement to that project, the elevated tank would provide a greater amount of water storage capacity for what would be the city’s biggest customer, as well as provide improved fire protection on the southeast side of Clinton and better service in that area as a result.

“The Southwood Tank will run concurrent with the water production expansion project,” Purvis said. “It may not start right away, but should be started by the end of the year.”

Originally estimated to be a $1.77 million project, the tank was a need predicated by industrial growth and increased water capacity and pressure for both consumer use and fire protection.

“In conjunction with the city’s water production expansion, the new tank will add 500,000 gallons of elevated storage capacity to the system,” Purvis stated in the city’s Capital Improvement Plan.

Smithfield Foods, which uses 1.5 million to 1.8 million gallons of water a day, would likely purchase at least 500,000 gallons of water from Clinton on a daily basis once the water plant expansion project is completed, city officials said. The funding that the city would get from having Smithfield as a customer would help offset the cost of the project.

“Upon completion of the tank, the city’s annual tank maintenance contract will increase, however the prospective industrial use will offset the additional operational costs,” Purvis stated.

Public Works director Jeff Vreugdenhil has pointed to the Southwood Drive location for the elevated tank as a prime one, in that it was formerly a well site, with 10-inch arterial water lines extending down U.S. 701 up Southwood Drive and to the base of where the tank will be.

“That line is already there, so it’s a good opportunity,” Vreugdenhil said. “We own the property, we can utilize it for a half-million gallon tank. Down the road, that would enable the 125,000-gallon tank that is across the street from Smithfield to be utilized for a reclaim.”

In the other bid award, a $558,190 bid from Herring-Rivenbark out of Kinston, the lowest of five bids received, was approved by Council for the upgrade and replacement of water lines across the city.

Many of the city’s water lines are more than 50 years old and the city is making efforts to replace water and sewer lines through a regularly funded program, with the infrastructure replacement to take place over two Community Development Block Grant funding cycles.

“This is the water line project through various parts of the city, upgrading our system, enlarging the lines, increasing the fire pressure flow through our grant,” the city manager said. “We will look to begin the CDBG project as soon as we can. You can probably expect to see that start within the next couple of months.”

The total project tallies $1.7 million, with one project totaling $800,000, including $40,000 from the city, with the second totaling $900,000 with $50,000 coming from the city, according to long-term plans. Both projects will serve low to moderate income housing.

“This project is the $800,000 project,” Purvis noted. “We are still awaiting award for the second project.”

** Source:  Chris Berendt, Sampson Independent

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Construction Underway on New $2.85 Million Mandeville Water Tower

(NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune archive)

(NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune archive)

Construction is underway on a new water tower on the eastern edge of Mandeville that should improve water pressure in parts of the city. The new 750,000-gallon, single pedestal tower is being built on Rapatel Street off U.S. 190 near Fontainebleau State Park.

Although the structure has not yet risen from the ground, the site has been cleared and workers are currently installing large water lines along nearby Montgomery Street. The city’s $2.85 million contract with a Kentucky company to build the tower includes moving the water lines and other parts of the water distribution system that will connect to the new tower.

Mandeville Public Works Director David deGeneres said the actual structure should begin to take shape sometime in October. The tower should be completely erected and substantially built in June of 2015 and the contractor should have punch list items completed by August of next year, he said.

Caldwell Tanks, Inc., the lone bidder on the project, got the construction job in April when the City Council authorized Mayor Donald Villere to sign a contract with the company. The tower was designed under a separate $211,306 contract with Richard C. Lambert Consultants, LLC.

The city’s water system consists of five underground wells and a 750,000-gallon water tower on St. Ann Street in the central part of the city. Another outdated water tower on Monroe Street has been decommissioned. The city leases it to communications companies for cell phone antennas.

The new tower is designed to improve water pressure, especially for firefighting, facilitate any expansion of the Mandeville water system and allow the city to shut down the St. Ann tower for maintenance, officials have said.

The new tower, which will be paid for primarily with state money, will be about 6 feet taller than the one on St. Ann Street, officials said.

The Louisville-based Caldwell Tanks, which built the city’s water tower on St. Ann Street about a decade ago, is one of the few companies in the U.S. that builds large, high rise water tanks, city officials have said.

The company has been building water tanks since 1887, according to its website.

** Source: Written By Kim Chatelain, NOLA.com/ The Times-Picayune

 

 

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Caldwell-Built Composite Elevated Tank Wins First Annual Tank of the Year Award

Aqua Pennsylvania’s Bensalem Composite Elevated Tank Wins                                           1st Annual Tank of the Year Award

Bensalem

Induron Protective Coatings, an industrial pioneer of ceramic epoxy coatings for high performance systems and potable water immersion, announced that Aqua Pennsylvania’s Bensalem Composite Elevated Tank is the company’s first annual Tank of the Year winner.  The two million gallon tank is located in Bensalem, Pennsylvania and features a patriotic logo.

Pennoni Associates of Philadelphia developed plans for the tank, which is located at the intersection of the PA Turnpike and Route 1 in Bensalem. Caldwell Tanks, the largest water tank fabricator in the United States, also worked on the project.

“Because of the location and exposure of the Bensalem Composite Elevated Tank, the specifications showcased our premier coatings: Permaclean 100 and Permagloss Flourourethane as the exterior finish coat and for the spectacular logo,” according to Induron’s project manager, Tex Enoch. “These products are engineered to provide decades of gloss and color retention.”

To construct the tank, the foundation was poured first, and the concrete pedestal soon followed. All but the floor and the roof of the steel storage tank were then constructed around the pedestal. Once that was completed, the exterior coating system was applied, and the tank was lifted onto the pedestal. The logo that reads “Bensalem Salutes America” was applied after the tank was lifted onto the pedestal due to inclement weather delays.

“This was a unique project with a fantastic outcome,” said Davies Hood, President of Induron. “It’s the perfect choice to win our first annual Tank of the Year contest, an initiative we look forward to continuing in the future to recognize outstanding projects we’ve achieved and completed.”

** Source: Coatings World

June 27, 2014